Policing

In the face of fear, be our Protector and Provider. Give us a strong sense of ultimate security in you, God. Teach our hearts to desire your kingdom above any earthy security.

– Prayer from The Liturgy of Politics, Kaitlyn Schiess

Articles | Books | Movies | Podcasts | Sermons | Shows


ARTICLES

ARTICLE: Why We Need Christians in Law Enforcement

Christians may disagree on whether police reform is needed or if it is needed to what extent. Regardless of that debate writer Charles Holmes Jr. says that Christians need to lead by example and get involved in law enforcement “to exemplify what love and true service in minority and poor communities looks like.”

ARTICLE: White, Black, and Blue: Christians Disagree Over Policing

Poll after poll shows that the majority of white evangelicals say that police treat black and white Americans the same despite the majority of black Protestants saying police treat white and black Americans vastly different. Why does the white evangelical church not believe the black protestant church? Bonnie Kristian lists four reasons why.


BOOKS


MOVIES


PODCASTS

PODCAST: Where the Gospel Meets Law Enforcement & Ethnicity

Co-hosts Jesse Eubanks and Rachel Szabo weave commentary from protestors and police while exploring the history of law and order and the evangelical community. For Christians, it is not either being for protestors or for police, but a third way that is having compassion for the police while seeking justice.

PODCAST: Do White Evangelicals Love Police More Than Their Neighbors?

Aaron L. Griffith, assistant professor of history at Sattler College in Boston, discusses the history of policing and the intertwining of evangelical’s support of law and order presidential candidates. Griffith also dives into what we can do to change by examining our motives, terms to be wary of and that we have to admit that we expect too much of the police which is a failure of how we have setup our society.

PODCAST: Listen. Lament, Legislate. Part II

An excellent, highly recommended round table discussion that focuses on the legislative side of the anti-racism movement. If you want to know what you can do as an individual then this is the podcast for you, but before listening make sure you listen to part 1.


SERMONS


SHOWS

SHOW: Flint Town

An intimate, engaging eight part series focusing on the Flint Police Department (Michigan) that shows the policing from all sides, the police, the public that supports them, the public that doesn’t support them, the politicians that support them and don’t support them, and everyone in-between. Flint Town shows the complexity of working for a police department in neighborhoods that are at high stress levels because of poverty, race, and, in Flint’s case, water issues. It also shows the differences in officer’s approaches to policing based on their ethnicity and where/how they grew up. This series is highly recommended.

SHOW: Policing in America needs to change. Trust me, I’m a cop.

Police officer Renee Mitchell tells a story where she had to choose between appeasing her superior by arresting an individual or letting the individual go and putting her career in jeopardy and how that decision cemented the idea that the way we police in America has to change.

SHOW: A Different Kind of Force – Policing Mental Illness

Conservatively speaking, one in ten police interactions involve a mentally ill person, but rarely are police trained to deal with a person having a mental illness crisis. A Different Kind of Force follows the San Antonino police mental health unit as they respond to mental health situations and strive to employ crisis intervention training despite not receiving enough funding and support.

SHOW: Policing the police (2020)

After documenting the Newark, New Jersey police department in 2016 historian and writer Jelani Cobb returns to examine the changes the police department has undergone in four years after being signaled out by the Department of Justice for routinely violating people’s civil rights and mandating changes.

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