ARTICLE: In Eugene, civilian response workers are dispatched to nonviolent crises

By Caitlin Yoshiko Kandil | Christian Century
Published in January of 2021

SUMMARY: As the United States grapples with ways to reduce police violence CAHOOTS (Crisis Assistance Helping Out on the Streets), a community based public safety program in Eugene, OR that responds to crises involving mental illness, homelessness, and addiction may be the what cities around the country need. The CAHOOTS workers are equal part medic (a nurse, paramedic or EMT) and crisis prevention worker with at least 500 hours of training. The workers are not armed and are designed to respond to non-violent crisis situations and non-emergent medical issues.

KEY QUOTE: “Violence is central to policing. And you can’t get away from that—that policing is essentially the management of the distribution of violence. I think we need to broaden that definition of what makes the public safe,” she said. “When you say ‘public safety’ most of the time, people just think of the police. But no, that’s not necessarily the only thing that makes people safe.”

BONUS: We have a thread on Twitter dedicated to articles about cities approaching policing in a different way.

DID YOU KNOW? We have curated numerous articles on policing.


Read the full article at Christian Century




Categories: Articles, Policing

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