ARTICLE: The Inevitable Tragedy of Christian Nationalism

At one point in his life author Joe Forrest thought if we had more Christians in the world then the world would get better, but the current iteration of Christian nationalism has him abandoning his theory. The idolatrous mixture of nationalism and religion has birthed Christians who simply think, believe, vote, and fear like themselves. Self-critique is blasphemy and demonizing those we disagree with is a virtue. Forrest points out that this idolatry is doomed to fail and is a major reason why the 15 books of the prophets in the Bible focused so intently on idolatry as humans are prone to worship things other than God.

BOOK: Bad Faith

How did the Republican party and white evangelicals become synonymous? Has abortion always been the focus of the Republican party and white evangelicals? In a tight, accessible 100 pages, author Randall Balmer traces the roots of the Religious Right and its wedding to the Republican party from the 1830s through the 1970s before linking the movement to its current iteration in the 21st century.

BOOK: Postcards from Babylon

The church, specifically the American church in the context of Postcards from Babylon, has been seduced by the allure of power and influence. This is not a new phenomenon, but has been going on for hundreds of years. The intertwining of faith and empire has blinded our eyes to the teachings of the Bible that calls the church to be a counter-cultural, prophetic voice against violence.

MOVIE: J.E.S.U.S.A.

Occasionally you think a documentary is going to be about one thing, but it completely surprises you. Sometimes that is good thing and sometimes it completely fails. In the case of J.E.S.U.S.A. it is the former. While the trailer, the marketing material, and the first 13 minutes of the film all point to exploring the conflation of American nationalism and Christianity the core question that the film truly attempts to answer is whether Christians should engage or abstain from violence.