ARTICLE: God and Guns

One pastor advocates for gun reform, the other trains and arms his congregation. Both had mass shootings take place at their churches. In this well-researched, long form article Kimberly Winston digs into the relationship between guns and Christians and what Christians, both armed and not armed, are doing to prevent gun violence.

ARTICLE: News as Spiritual Formation

Most of the news on television involves unactionable items - a murder, a natural disaster, etc. - where there is little that we can do about it - especially if it is on another continent. Anglican priest D.J. Marotta argues that Christians need to be "hyper-local" with our news sources. What this means is being in community with our neighbors, friends, and family where you can respond to information (news) with kindness and love within your sphere of influence.

ARTICLE: Five Myths About the Pilgrims

Did you know that the Pilgrims had a fondness for colorful clothing and not the stereotypical plain, black wardrobe that is normally depicted? Did you know that religious freedom was not the primary motivation for the Pilgrims to cross the Atlantic? Our favorite Thanksgiving historian Robert Tracy McKenzie debunks five myths that are commonly associated with the Pilgrims.

ARTICLE: Why I Decline This Opportunity for Thanksgiving

Navajo and author Mark Charles uses Abraham Lincoln's 1863 Thanksgiving Proclamation as a backdrop for detailing the indigenous ethnic cleansing that was happening under the sixteenth president's watch while declaring a day for "thanksgiving and praise." Charles previously celebrated Thanksgiving (see The Myth of Thanksgiving and Racial Conciliation), but starting in 2018 he stopped after continuing to learn about the history of the holiday. This is a good article to understand why some people choose not to celebrate Thanksgiving.

ARTICLE: The Myth of Thanksgiving and Racial Conciliation

Navajo author Mark Charles says that Thanksgiving is built on a "mythological potluck celebrated by Native Americans and Pilgrims back in the 'Good ole Days.'" That myth is deeply hurtful to indigenous people. Does that mean we need to stop celebrating Thanksgiving? No, but we should recognize the wounds that are still open and not perpetuate the myths associated with Thanksgiving.