PODCAST: How to Redeem Thanksgiving

Like many American celebrations, Thanksgiving has been romanticized and mythologized. True, the Wampanoag and the Pilgrims did work together for almost a generation, but the story does not end there - it is messy and complicated. Genocide, white supremacy, and forced boarding schooling are just some of the tactics that were used by white people to control the indigenous population. Does this mean we need to stop celebrating Thanksgiving? Absolutely not, but we need to tell the whole story. Skip to the 4 min mark to get to the interview with George Fox professor of faith and culture Randy Woodley.

PODCAST: Understanding Critical Race Theory with Bradly Mason

Big Brown Army host DeCruz and critical race theory expert Bradly Mason have an in-depth conversation where DeCruz asks several honest, poignant questions about CRT. Mason has clearly done a lot of research on CRT and we appreciated his nuanced answers. We particularly liked when he pointed out that as Christians we don't have to accept or reject CRT part and parcel as we rarely do that with other issues. We also liked that he recognizes that before starting a conversation terms must be defined because the uses and definitions of certain terms can be very different to another individual.

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PODCAST: Critical Theory & the Christian with David Fitch

Although the podcast starts off a little goofy, Phil Vischer, Skye Jethani and Kaitlyn Schiess discuss the wholesale rejection of critical race theory in a meeting between six southern Baptist presidents. The real meat though is in the interview ( where we recommend you start -- skip to 43:19) with David Fitch who says that critical race theory, and all critical theories for that matter, are good diagnostic tools, but they must not be divorced from a Christian view of justice. The interview provides a succinct, nuanced history of critical theory that does not throw the baby out with the bath water.

PODCAST: Is Critical Race Theory compatible with Christianity? Neil Shenvi & Rasool Berry

Christian apologist Neil Shenvi and pastor of The Bridge Church (Brooklyn, NY) Rasool Berry debate the many definitions of critical race theory - what it is, what it isn't, the nuances, and the sticking points. Shenvi and Berry role model what is it like to have a conversation with a fellow Christian, but disagree about aspects of a certain subject. Skip to 2:45 to get to the interview.

PODCAST: Policing with Chief Allen Banks

In a sincere, hopeful conversation Round Rock (Texas) police chief Allen Banks talks about his implementation of community policing in Round Rock, why the police shouldn't be the first responders for everything, policing training, diversity in police hiring, how to create equitable and safe communities and much more. If you want to know how a community is changing policing right now, then this is the podcast for you.

PODCAST: Race, CRT and Evangelism with Dr. Ed Uszynski

In a vulnerable and nuanced discussion about CRT, politics, and the church, host Preston Sprinkle and Dr. Ed Uszynski discuss finding the "transcendent middle." They also identify that the Christian approach to critical race theory (CRT) is often met with a lack of empathy and theological understanding of justice . Skip to the nine-minute mark to get to the meat of the interview.

PODCAST: What is biblical justice? (Jude 3 Project)

In a roundtable discussion Dr. Charlie Dates, Dr. Yolanda Pierce, Dr. Nicole Massie Martin, and Jemar Tisby discuss a number of questions regarding justice including what justice is, how to live in tension in a society that will never be perfect and yet as Christians we are called to change, when to use power and/or protest, what reparations could look like and why the Bible provides us with the unique framework to overcome injustice and prevent those in power from abusing it. The highlights include the nuanced talk of violence (18:10) and reparations (32:10).

PODCAST: “After Whiteness” with Dr. Willie Jennings

The reason why many white people become defensive when talking about white privilege is because white people have never had to reckon with whiteness as an identity. Author, professor, and theologian Dr. Willie Jennings says that we have to recognize whiteness and it's deep roots in American society and the American church before reconciliation can happen. If you are white, this is a difficult, but needed, critique to listen to.