TV-14 | YouTube | 25 min
Released in January of 2021

SUMMARY: A powerful personal narrative from Winfred Rembert who survived a lynching as a teenager. A must watch.

KEY QUOTES: “That lynching is on my back. And it is dragging me down even today even though its been some 40 some years ago. And even today it is dragging me down. (I) can’t rest. I can’t rest. I lay in my bed and I can’t rest. I am running for my life every night. Somebody’s after me. And I don’t know what to do.”

DID YOU KNOW? We have distilled the media we have curated into guided learning paths to help you learn about racism in your preferred learning style.



More curated shows on racism:

SHOW: Race, Faith, and Community

Since the 16th century when Jesuit priest Jose de Acosta created the theology of extraction giving a Christian rationale for exploiting indigenous people on land with valuable minerals we have been dealing with the affects of racialized geography. In a speech for Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary Dr. Willie Jennings discusses the way the rich and powerful manipulate the system to ensure that things stay the way they are. This applies to race too, the rich and powerful (mostly the dominant white culture in the United States) manipulate the system to ensure that property is divided up so the rich and powerful have their part of cities/towns/etc. and the not rich and powerful are kept out.

Read more

SHOW: The Jim Crow Museum

The founder and curator of the New Jim Crow museum, Dr. David Pilgrim, gives short history lessons as he walks viewers through his museum. One of the points that the museum attempts to get across (and does well) is the pervasive nature of the racist laws, caricatures, and violence against Black people across the United States. Well worth 23 minutes of your time. This is an excellent video for a history class or small group discussion.

Read more

SHOW: Invisible Minorities

A one-hour lecture on the history of discrimination against Asian people in America and how the model minority myth still exists and is used as a wedge between the Asian and Black communities.

Read more

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