By D.L. Mayfield | Christianity Today
Published in November of 2016

SUMMARY: A meal, particularly at Thanksgiving, is an excellent way to get to know your neighbors and/or co-workers. But to avoid the common traps of the “good giver” and the “poor receiver,” we must first practice true hospitality by putting in the time to develop relationships.

KEY QUOTE: “How can we find ourselves at the tables of people who are different from us? How can we be in real, long-term relationships with those we might only see once a year as we drop off a Thanksgiving food box? How can we eschew outreach programs—which sometimes create and highlight divides—for mutuality, and how can we trade charity for compassion (which literally means “suffering with”)?”

DID YOU KNOW? We have a learning capsule about Thanksgiving with resources to help faithfully learn about the holiday.


Read the full article on Christianity Today


More curated articles on Thanksgiving:

ARTICLE: Five Myths About the Pilgrims

Did you know that the Pilgrims had a fondness for colorful clothing and not the stereotypical plain, black wardrobe that is normally depicted? Did you know that religious freedom was not the primary motivation for the Pilgrims to cross the Atlantic? Our favorite Thanksgiving historian Robert Tracy McKenzie debunks five myths that are commonly associated with the Pilgrims.

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ARTICLE: Why I Decline This Opportunity for Thanksgiving

Navajo and author Mark Charles uses Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Thanksgiving Proclamation as a backdrop for detailing the indigenous ethnic cleansing that was happening under the sixteenth president’s watch while declaring a day for “thanksgiving and praise.” Charles previously celebrated Thanksgiving (see The Myth of Thanksgiving and Racial Conciliation), but starting in 2018 he stopped after continuing to learn about the history of the holiday. This is a good article to understand why some people choose not to celebrate Thanksgiving.

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