By David Williams | 10000places.com
Published in January of 2016

SUMMARY: In December of 2015 Michelle Higgins gave a keynote speech at the Urbana 15 missions conference in support of Black Lives Matter. The response to her statement from some evangelicals was swift and all to common. All lives matter, the BLM movement is socialist and Christians shouldn’t support BLM as they are out to destroy the nuclear family were some of the common rebuttals.

Pastor David Williams attempts to breakdown the difference between BLM’s hashtag, movement, and network while trying to get at the truth. Although this is centered around InterVarsity’s position in 2016, much of the article is relevant today. Lots of excellent links included in the article to dig deeper as well.

KEY QUOTE: “It is a commitment to courageous and prophetic honesty about the plight of the Black community, and a call to defend the dignity of our Black brothers and sisters, friends and neighbors, wherever their lives and dignity are threatened or diminished. However, commitment to the truth that Black lives matter does not automatically commit one to any particular set of proposed policies or reforms.”

AFTER READING THE ARTICLE: Read chapter 4 in Compassion (&) Conviction where the authors talk on how to be co-belligerents with organizations that don’t 100% line up with Christian values.


Read the full article at 10000places.com


More curated articles on black lives matter:

ARTICLE: Dear White Brothers and Sisters: Why #BlackLivesMatter Matters to You

Living in intimate relationships with people of color or at the very least speaking with people of different opinions is a must for Christians to work through racial issues says Natasha Sistrunk Robinson, the Assistant Director of the Center for the Development of Evangelical Leadership (CDEL) at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Sistrunk Robinson also explains three things to help white evangelicals know where some black people are coming from when they say black lives matter.

Read more

ARTICLE: Stung Like a Bee

Using the story of boxer Mohammed Ali leaving his Christian faith because the church he attended would not stand up for him in the face of discrimination actor Gauis Charles wonders if the Christian church is in a similar moment. The church in the past has been complicit with slavery and many churches have not engaged in anti-racism teaching. Will the failure of the church to lead on issues of race result in people walking away?

Read more

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