By Pass the Mic | Listen | 40m
Published in June of 2021

SUMMARY: In an informative and practical 40-minutes Jemar Tisby touches on three reasons why he advocated for Juneteenth to be a national holiday, discusses the historical origins and context of the holiday, lists some unintended consequences of making Juneteenth a federal holiday, and humbly suggests that Black and white people should commemorate the holiday differently.

KEY QUOTE: “We’ve got to get the narrative around Juneteenth right. We have got to get it tight and at the beginning. We’ve got to do it proactively. What I want to do is walk through some of the history…to give you a little bit of context around the significance of this history and then I want to talk about today…and what we do now that Juneteenth is now a national holiday. “

DID YOU KNOW? We have a learning capsule about Juneteenth with resources to help you faithfully learn about the holiday.



More curated resources on Juneteenth:

LEARNING CAPSULE: Juneteenth

What is Juneteenth? Why do we celebrate it? How should we celebrate it? After reading the following articles, listening to the podcast, and watching the show you should have a decent understanding of what the holiday is and why we celebrate and/or commemorate it.

BOOK: On Juneteenth

In a previously curated article Jemar Tisby aptly recommends that white and Black Americans should commemorate Juneteenth differently. One of the ways non-Black Americans can commemorate the holiday is to learn about the history of Black people in America. On Juneteenth consists of a collection of six engrossing essays interlacing author Annette Gordon-Reed’s memories from…

ARTICLE: Juneteenth – What Lies Beneath?

U.S. history professor at Bethel University John H. Haas suggests that Juneteenth is a time for Americans to reflect on how “how hard America has found it to live up to its own ideals” while pondering why America is the only nation that required a war, the bloodiest war in its history, to repeal slavery.

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