By Tish Harrison Warren | Amazon.com | 184 pages
Published in November of 2016

SUMMARY: Many American Christians have bifurcated their lives into the secular and the sacred. We have divorced divine meaning from our mundane tasks and everyday jobs. We have adopted the rhythms, beliefs, and postures of the world. As a result, there is little difference between how Christians and non-Christians live their lives. Americans of all ages are leaving the church while depression, hopelessness, and suicide continue to climb. Author and priest Tish Harrison Warren says it doesn’t have to be this way.

“God, in delight and wisdom, has made, named, and blessed this average day,” Harrison Warren writes. “What I in my weakness see as another monotonous day in a string of days, God has given as a singular gift.”

Harrison Warren continues, “What if all these boring parts matter to God? What if days passed in ways that feel small and insignificant to us are weighty with meaning and part of the abundant life that God has for us?”

Not convinced? Harrison Warren aptly points out that much of Jesus’ life wasn’t recorded in the Bible. He worked as a carpenter doing mundane tasks living in obscurity. Throw in the fact that God chose to send his son in human form means God has put immense value on our human bodies.

“Because of the incarnation and those long, unrecorded years of Jesus’ life, our small, normal lives matter. If Christ spent time in obscurity, then there is infinite worth found in obscurity. If Christ spent most of this life in quotidian ways, then all of life is brought under this lordship. There is no task too small or too routine to reflect God’s glory and worth.”

Does that include folding the laundry? Yep. Making dinner night after night? Absolutely. Taking out the trash? You bet. How about answering e-mails? You know it! We have infinite worth and everything we do has divine meaning.

“God is forming us into new people. And the place of that formation is in the small moments of today,” Harrison Warren writes.

These “small moments,” routines and practices make up our daily liturgy. It reveals what we are being shaped by. Whether we choose to grab our smartphone and scroll through Twitter or choose to make the bed in the morning says, “something that both reveal(s) and shape(s) what (we) love and worship.”

I know the smartphone gets picked on a lot, but Harrison Warren’s reasoning for starting the day by making the bed instead of on the smartphone is compelling, “Starting  the day by making the bed in silence instead of on a smartphone starts the day as a co-laborer with God instead of a consumer.”

To be clear, Harrison Warren never guilt trips the reader — we are all guilty of doom scrolling in the morning or at night. The point she is making is that everything we do is sacred and therefore the practices we do from praying before meals to how we respond in an argument with our spouse are all meaningful opportunities to worship our Creator.

KEY QUOTE: “Because of the incarnation and those long, unrecorded years of Jesus’ life, our small, normal lives matter. If Christ spent time in obscurity, then there is infinite worth found in obscurity. If Christ spent most of this life in quotidian ways, then all of life is brought under this lordship. There is no task too small or too routine to reflect God’s glory and worth.”


BONUS: Listen to Harrison Warren on The Gospel Bound podcast talk about her book.

BONUS II: Use TISH22 at ivpress.com to get 30% off The Liturgy of the Ordinary and free shipping.

DID YOU KNOW? Sunday to Saturday has a Good Reads page where we post all of the books we have read – even the ones that didn’t make the cut.



Our latest curated content:

BOOK: Taking America Back for God

Depending on the places you get your news or the social circles you run in the term Christian nationalism has a positive or negative connotation. With the explosion in conversation around the term since the January 6 insurrection, it is challenging to divorce the definition, good or bad, from today’s context. This is where Taking America Back for God immensely helps. Sociologists Samuel Perry, (University of Oklahoma), and Andrew Whitehead, (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis) draw primarily on data from the 2017 Baylor Religion Survey to provide a nuanced and constructive look at the term that has influenced American politics for decades.

BOOK: The Great Sex Rescue

For many Christians how we approach sex boils down to one statement – it should happen within the confines of marriage between a man and a women. While that is a good starting point Christian culture writ large has done an abdominal job of talking and teaching about sex within a Christian framework.  Best-selling Christian books such as Every Man’s Battle (4 million copies sold) and Love & Respect (2.2 million copies sold) promote devastating ideas such as sex as a need just for the husband, obligation sex, and seeing women’s bodies as dangerous. Authors Shelia Wray Gregoire, her daughter Rebecca Gregoire Lindenbach, and Joanna Sawatsky have made it their life’s work to correct that narrative.

SHOW: Is Christian nationalism on the rise in the United States?

Chair of religious studies at the University of Pennsylvania Anthea Butler, professor of history and gender studies at Calvin University Kristen Du Mez, and executive director of the Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty Amanda Tyler engage in a lively panel discussion with host Marc Lamont Hill as he tries to understand the disconnect between white Christion nationalism, what is preached in the Bible, and what is penned in the founding documents of the United States.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: